Return to ENGW 4341 Syllabus

Current Theories Weekly Calendar

NOTE: The calendar below includes specific details about assignments, include the questions you’ll need to complete for Student-Led Seminars, which are the foundation of your Wednesday Writing assignments. This is a supplement to the more concise Calendar at a Glance. They work together, so be familiar with each. Like the Calendar at a Glance, the hyperlinks here will give you access to necessary folders and/or readings. Also, the slides from each week will be available after class; just click on the date.

WEEK  16

 Monday, April 25

  • Prototype/Semester Project Peer Review
  • Discuss Author’s Note

Wednesday, April 27

  • Instructor Feedback Returned
  • Course Evaluations

HOMEWORK, to be complete ASAP

Beginning Thursday, April 21, you will be able to complete the course evaluations for this class. You’ll receive an email with instructions. These evaluations are very important for the university and for me. I will distribute my own evaluations—which focus more on the content of the course—next week. When you are writing your summary comments, I have a few additional questions that would help me evaluate the effectiveness of the course:

  1. In what ways did this class help clarify the interests of our discipline (Rhetoric & Composition)?
  2. In what ways, if any, did this course challenge your expectations for how you should talk about what it means to be an ENGW major?
  3. How, if at all, did the genre-focused, research-driven project affect your learning in this course?
  4. How useful was it for you (if at all) to work on this individually designed research project? How did designing your own discipline-related project contribute to your understanding of theories of rhetoric and composition?

Friday, April 29

  • Semester Project Due @ 11:59 pm
  • Author’s Note Due @ 11:59 pm

WEEK  1

Monday, January 11

Introduction to the course

Syllabus and Calendar Discussion

Google Drive overview

Create your 4341 course folder in Google Drive. For additional help, the process is described here. Share the folder with me (dr.moriah.mccracken@gmail.com) as soon as you create it. To practice sharing materials via Google Drive, type up your answers to today’s discussion questions, and share that Google Doc (not an uploaded file) with me by organizing the file into our shared Google Drive / 4341 / Day 1 Answers folder. Use the following naming procedures: Last Name, Day 1.

Grades and attendance are tracked in Canvas, but otherwise, everything related to this course will be posted here and/or available via Google Drive.

One final reminder, as you look at the calendar below, I am listing the readings that should be completed before you arrive in class. This means that you need to read the section of Enos before Wednesday, and you should prepare notes for the student-led seminar, which are the foundation of your first Wednesday Writing assignment.

HOMEWORK, to be completed before Wednesday

Enos, “Professing the New Rhetorics: Prologue.” Read pages 5-15 (stopping at Richard Young).

Using the Wednesday Writing prompts as an entry point as necessary, come prepared to discuss the positions of each of the polylog participants. I want you to have mapped out the participants’ main ideas, noting and tracking the questions raised by the different voices.

KEY TERMS: “modern” rhetoric, “new” rhetoric, New Rhetoric, discipline, hermeneutic, neologisms, process

READING QUESTIONS: (1) Why are they talking about rhetorics (plural, not singular)? Are these rhetorics new? If so, why? how? (2) What is the source of the tension (splits) between rhetoric and composition? Why? (3) What are the participants saying about the first-year writing (FYW) issue?

Wednesday, January 13

Assigning “hats” to the Polylog Participants

Thinking about Rhetorics and Divisions

HOMEWORK, to be completed before our next meeting

Enos, “Professing the New Rhetorics: Prologue.” Read 15-35.

By now, it should be clear that I want you tracking each participant’s questions and points. Noting which ideas and/or questions are introduced by the public and which are raised by the participants, generate a list of the issues that the participants want to discuss.

Friday, January 15

No f2f Class

Online Assignment Due to January 15 Folder

In lieu of our f2f meeting for today, I’d like you to do two things. First, share the list of questions you think were raised about our discipline in the second half of the Polylog. Beneath these questions, track the basic answers provided by the participants (and audience if necessary). This is the “content” part of the reading assignment. Second, which questions are intriguing to you? That is, which of the questions and/or answers connect with something you wrote about on Day 1 of our class? Explain (~300 words).

HOMEWORK, to be completed before next Wednesday

Trimbur, “Changing the Question: Should Writing Be Studied?

Russell, “Activity Theory and Its Implications for Writing Instruction,” via Canvas

As you read this pair of articles, look for relationships between what Russell was doing in 1995 and what Trimbur claims in 2003, namely that we should “organize the study of writing as an intellectual resource for undergraduates” (23). You want to get the “gist” of activity theory, not be an expert in it. However, remember that the readings of this unit will serve as the foundation for your Short Paper assignment. So, read and process enough to know why Russell is using activity theory, but don’t feel obligated to learn the theory before class. You’ll also want to pay particular attention to the “Introduce Students to Rhetoric/Language” section, which will be important when we get to Downs & Wardle and start thinking about practice.

KEY TERMS: GWSI, activity systems, UED

READING QUESTIONS:  (a) Trimbur explains that different questions have dominated the discipline. What is his explanation for why the question changes? Note his explanations and rationales. (b) If writing is going to be studied, what are the considerations that we must take into account? That is, what would it mean to study writing? (c) How might the discipline change its identity without sacrificing its values, particularly the value it places on the autonomy of student writers?

WEEK 2

Monday, January 18—No Classes

See Friday for what to prepare for Wednesday’s class meeting. Use either the Wednesday Writing prompts or the questions below to prepare for the student-led seminar.

HOMEWORK, to be completed before Wednesday

Trimbur, “Changing the Question: Should Writing Be Studied?

Russell, “Activity Theory and Its Implications for Writing Instruction,” via Canvas

As you read this pair of articles, look for relationships between what Russell was doing in 1995 and what Trimbur claims in 2003, namely that we should “organize the study of writing as an intellectual resource for undergraduates” (23). You want to get the “gist” of activity theory, not be an expert in it. However, remember that the readings of this unit will serve as the foundation for your Short Paper assignment. So, read and process enough to know why Russell is using activity theory, but don’t feel obligated to learn the theory before class. You’ll also want to pay particular attention to the “Introduce Students to Rhetoric/Language” section, which will be important when we get to Downs & Wardle and start thinking about practice.

KEY TERMS: GWSI, activity systems, UED

READING QUESTIONS:  (a) Trimbur explains that different questions have dominated the discipline. What is his explanation for why the question changes? Note his explanations and rationales. (b) If writing is going to be studied, what are the considerations that we must take into account? That is, what would it mean to study writing? (c) How might the discipline change its identity without sacrificing its values, particularly the value it places on the autonomy of student writers?

Wednesday, January 20

Studying Writing

Problems with Writing Courses

Is our discipline more than a single writing course?

HOMEWORK, to be completed before Friday

Review Short Paper assignment, bring questions

Yancey, “Introduction: Coming to Terms” 

Adler-Kassner and Wardle, “Naming What We Know

KEY TERMS: Threshold concepts

READING QUESTIONS: In her introduction, Yancey notes 8 points of agreement across Naming What We Know. What are these 8 points, and how do you see them intersecting with the work of Trimbur and Russell? How can you see NWWK emerging from the work done in 1995 and 2003? What are the caveats and cautions offered by Adler-Kassner and Wardle? How do they reflect the problems of identity we’ve seen emerging in the discipline?

Friday, January 21

Understanding Threshold Concepts

Why are we naming what we know?

HOMEWORK, to be completed before Monday

Concept 1: Writing is a Social and Rhetorical Activity (pages 15-34)

Concept 3: Writing Enacts and Creates Identities and Ideologies (pages 48-58)

There are no key terms or reading questions for Monday. Rather than writing from Corderian questions, I want to see what you find interesting and important from these various entries for each of the major concepts. I recommend identifying key quotes and ideas to write from; you may even want to choose one of the minor concepts to write about for your Wednesday Writing. Because each entry will be shorter and we’ll have lots of voices and ideas to discuss, you may want a running list of who said what for your quick reference. We’ll be using the seminar-style approach on Monday, so, once again, your attendance credit depends on your contribution.

WEEK  3

Monday, January 25

Wrestling with Threshold Concepts

HOMEWORK, to be completed before Wednesday

Short Paper assigned

Driscoll’s “Introduction to Primary Research”. We aren’t the target audience for this piece, but she does a good job of highlighting some of the key issues we’ll need to address for you to fully develop your SP memos on Monday. You may be able to read this simply as a refresher.

Wednesday, January 27

Primary Research

Planning for Short Paper

We are not meeting in class on Wednesday. To be counted present for Wednesday’s class meeting, you need to email me (via my SEU email address: ilamc@stedwards.edu) a Short Paper memo before 11:59 pm tonight. 

Your memo should quickly (in less than 600 words) explain your position for what you think is currently happening in writing instruction on our campus (or what you think you want to better understand about writing instruction at any level and in any course). You should also detail the micro-research you will conduct to support your position. Paste your answers to the following prompts into the body of your email; do not send me an attachment and do not upload this to GDrive.

(1) Give me context. Using the readings we’ve completed thus far as a conversation starter, help me see how your short-paper idea emerges from the readings we’ve done in class. Walk me through the relationship you see between what you’ll discuss in the Short Paper and the content of our readings; that is, how will your short paper take up the ideas of activity theory and threshold concepts? Yes, I want to see how you’re processing those arguments before you start applying them outside your Wednesday Writings.

(2) Give me the primary overview. What do I mean by “micro-research”? One interview with one expert. One observation of one class; one observation of one tutor’s Writing Center sessions. Analysis of one major assignment in a disciplinary course. Collection of one set of data to be analyzed. Collection of one survey (under 10 questions) from one group (less than 20 people). You will determine what the “micro” feature is, but, regardless of method, you need to explain the instrument you intend to use. The short paper suggests interviews and assignment analysis, but you have some freedom to pitch an idea. If you’re doing a survey, let me see the questions you’ll ask exactly as you’ll ask them. Same for an interview. If you’re observing something, what are the questions you’ll use to guide those observations.

Use Driscoll as a resource for this part. She’ll help you anticipate the kinds of questions or concerns I might have. For example, how will you adhere to ethical research? How are you weighing the benefits/restrictions of your chosen method?

(3) Let me know if you have questions or concerns. Embed those at the end of your memo.

Again, this is due to my inbox no later than 11:59 pm on Wednesday. Failure to submit on time will result in an absence. I will be responding to these as they come in.

HOMEWORK, to be completed before Friday

Taczak, “The Question of Transfer

Wardle, “Creative Repurposing for Expansive Learning: Considering ‘Problem-Exploring’ and ‘Answer-Getting’ Dispositions in Individuals and Fields

Friday, January 29

Threshold Concepts Meet Transfer

HOMEWORK, or what to complete before class on Monday

Downs and Wardle, “Teaching about Writing, Righting Misconceptions: (Re)Envisioning ‘First-Year Composition’ as ‘Introduction to Writing Studies’”

READING QUESTIONS: (a) What are the three (3) misconceptions about writing that D&W name? How have you experienced these misconceptions? How does their proposed course mediate those misconceptions? (b) In what ways does their course redesign resist and pushback against those misconceptions? (c) To what extent to do you see WAW courses as working within activity theory frames? with transfer theories? with threshold concepts?

WEEK  4

Monday, February 1

Writing about Writing pedagogy

HOMEWORK, to be completed before Wednesday

On Wednesday, we’ll have our first peer review of your Short Paper project. You should bring one hardcopy of a good faith first draft of your theoretical framing to class to be counted present; you should also share a Google Doc version of this draft with the Short Paper: Theories folder.

What is a good faith draft? This is a draft that shows you wrestling with the content of our class readings thus far in the semester (at least the Writing Studies unit). You should not only be carefully representing the ideas of the scholars but engaging them in the context of your short paper—use your lens of our campus, our local situatedness to make sense of the theories you chose. They aren’t expected to be perfect. Please note that you’ll receive feedback from me on these drafts.

Wednesday, February 3

Peer Review of Short Paper: Theoretical Foundations

HOMEWORK, to be completed before Friday

Upload a draft of your micro-research plan to the common folder for my review. My preference is before 6:00 am on Friday. Those submitted by the deadline will get feedback before class begins.

Review Driscoll. In class, we’ll discuss the methodology reading and review and edit your proposed plans.

Friday, February 5

Refining Micro-research

Review of Primary Research Methodologies

HOMEWORK, to be completed before Monday

Kelder,  “Rethinking Literacy Studies: From the Past to the Present”

Even though you are still working on your Short Paper, we’re going to move right along into the Literacy Studies unit. This new week will have us returning to questions of definition, but we’re no longer trying to define writing or to articulate how writing should be taught; instead, we’re going to ask questions about what it means to be literate and what literacy means in the US.

KEY TERMS: literacy myth, literacy event, literacy practice, ideological model, autonomous model, the Great Divide

READING QUESTIONS: (a) What is literacy? (b) How does the context for the use of literacy affect its definitions? What connections can you make between the uses of literacy and the threshold concepts of our discipline? (c) How might we compare historical definitions for literacy—what is unique about those definitions used by various researchers?

WEEK  5

Monday, February 8

  • Defining Literacy
  • Understanding Literacy Studies

Wednesday, February 10

  • Short Paper Work Day

In lieu of our regular class meeting, you may have today to finalize the collection of your primary data or to prepare your full draft of the Short Paper, which is due for an in-class workshop on Friday.

I will be in our regular classroom to answer questions and/or help you troubleshoot.

HOMEWORK, to be completed before Friday, February 12

  1. Upload a Google Doc version of your draft-in-progress to our Short Paper: Peer Review folder.
  2. Bring one hard copy of your project to class.

My preference will be for you to complete the peer review online, but if you don’t have a laptop you can bring to our classroom, then the hardcopy will suffice.

Friday, February 12

HOMEWORK, to be completed before Monday, February 15

  1. Finalize your short paper, using the feedback from your peers and from me.
  2. Make sure you include an Author’s Note as the first page of this document. In this Author’s Note, you should (a) provide an overall assessment of your paper, identifying what works and what doesn’t work well in your mind; (b) discuss your research methodologies, including what changes you would make with more time and/or resources; and (c) direct me to specific questions and/or concerns you have about the conversation you’ve created between your primary and secondary data.

Before next week, I’d like you to take a few minutes and complete our Week 5 Barometer. During the semester, I like to check in with students and see how the course is going from their perspective. Once you click on the above link, you’ll find six questions I’d like you to answer as thoughtfully and honestly as possible. Based on your answers, which will be anonymous, I may propose adjustments and changes to our class as we move forward with the semester. The goal here is for us to be engaged in a dialogue about what is and is not contributing to your learning.

WEEK  6

Monday, February 15

HOMEWORK, to be completed before Wednesday, February 17

  1. Daniell, “Narratives of Literacy: Connecting Composition to Culture”

READING QUESTIONS: (a) What are grand narratives in literacy studies? (b) What are little narratives? (c) How might little narratives work against grand narratives? How can we see this shift in Kelder’s history of literacy?

Wednesday, February 17

  • Week 5 Barometer Discussed
  • Little Narratives
  • Grand Narratives

HOMEWORK, to be completed before Friday

  1. Hirsch, “Cultural Literacy
  2. Hirsch, “A Wealth of Words
  3. Baker, “Culture Warrior, Gaining Ground 

READING QUESTIONS: (a) How is Hirsch defining literacy? You want to frame his definition in light of those offered by Kelder and Daniell. (b) What purpose or role does literacy serve in daily life, according to Hirsch? (c) What are the implications of Hirsch’s theories?

Friday, February 19

  • Cultural Literacy

HOMEWORK, to be complected before Monday

  1. Bizzell, “Arguing about Literacy

READING QUESTIONS: (a) What are the various definitions we see emerging for literacy? How is rhetorical literacy different from the other definitions we’ve considered? (b) How do we model rhetorical literacy in the classroom? In what ways do you see our definitions of literacy influencing the questions and concerns driving educational situations and classrooms?

WEEK  7

Monday, February 22

  • Bizzell, “Arguing about Literacy”
  • What are the various definitions for literacy?
  • What is rhetorical literacy?
  • How do definitions of literacy influence educational situations and classrooms?

NOTE: If you’re interested, here are the notes you all wrote on the Hirsch quotes from Friday.

HOMEWORK, to be completed before Wednesday

  1. Read Ehninger, “On Systems of Rhetoric

READING QUESTIONS: Ehninger claims that by viewing the past of Western rhetorics we can not only chart the future of rhetorics, but we can also give up the search for one definition. Why does he think we shouldn’t define rhetoric? What does he suggest are the unifying concerns and characteristics of rhetoric?

Wednesday, February 24

  • Ehninger, “On Systems of Rhetoric”

HOMEWORK, to be completed before Friday

  1. Read Ritchie and Ronald’s, “Introduction: A Gathering of Rhetorics” (from Available Means)

READING QUESTIONS: (a) How do Ritchie and Ronald define women’s rhetoric(s)? What metaphors do they use to explain their work? (b) What are their principles of gathering? How do those principles help us define women’s rhetorics? (c) What are the rhetorical strategies and exigencies which can define women’s rhetorics? (d) How is R&R’s work building off the work of Ehninger?

Friday, February 26

  • Defining Women’s Rhetorics

HOMEWORK, to be completed before Monday

  1. Read Aspasia (in Rhetorical Tradition)
  2. Listen to the Mere Rhetoric entry on Aspasia (~9 minutes)

READING QUESTIONS: (a) Using Ritchie and Ronald’s definitions of women’s rhetoric(s), in what ways does this entry—written by a man reporting another man’s words, who was reporting yet another man’s claims were words written by a woman—qualify as women’s rhetoric(s)? (b) What seems to have been Aspasia’s contribution to classical rhetorical theory?

WEEK  8

Monday, February 29

HOMEWORK, to be completed before Wednesday

  1. Sor Juana de la Cruz (RT, 780-788)
  2. Mere Rhetoric Podcast
  3. What themes and/or exigencies identified by Ritchie and Ronald are evident in the excerpt we read? Bring a list of quotes and/or points you want to discuss.

Wednesday, March 2

  • Sor Juana de la Cruz

HOMEWORK, to be completed before Friday

  1. Review the criteria for your Semester Proposal, including the template requirements. Bring generic questions.
  2. Bring a few questions and ideas for your semester project to class.
  3. Make a copy of the template for yourself. Organize this into your private 4341 folder. Make sure you properly label the file and save as a Google Doc, not a .docx file.

Friday, March 4

  • Semester Proposal reviewed
  • Semester Research Questions workshop

HOMEWORK, to be completed before Monday

  1. Keep making progress on your semester proposal. Remember that I leave next Wednesday, so if you want to discuss this in person, schedule an appointment early.
  2. Read Jim Corder, “Argument as Emergence, Rhetoric as Love

READING QUESTIONS: (a) What is Corder up to in this article? What seems to be his exigence for writing this piece? (b) What is wrong with how we currently conceive of argument, according to Corder? (c) How does he propose we teach argument?

WEEK  9

Monday, March 7

  • Jim Corder Day—This is as good as it gets, folks!
  • Preparing for Semester Rx Workshop

HOMEWORK, or what to complete before Wednesday

  1. Get a full draft of your Rx Proposal drafted before the workshop. I want to see your reading heuristic ideas, the kinds of sources you’ll use (both primary and secondary), as well as your articulation of why this project matters to you.
  2. Please also remember that you need to connect your project to our larger conversations from these first 8 weeks. The Statement of Interest, in particular, should help me see how you arrived at this project through our previous course readings.
  3. Also remember that I will not have access to email beginning at 5:00 pm on Wednesday, so you need to run any questions or issues you have by me in advance of this deadline.

Wednesday, March 9

  • Semester Research Proposal Workshop
  • Bring one hardcopy of your proposal to class. Or, bring an electronic device for online work.

HOMEWORK, or what to complete before Friday

  1. Proposals are due by 11:59 pm on Friday. Make sure you complete all sections.
  2. Make sure your proposal is organized into your 4341 folder under the title: Final Semester Research Proposal. Make sure it is a GDoc file; do not save it as a .docx file.

Friday, March 11

  • No face-to-face class meeting
  • Dr. McCracken attending Consortium of Independent Colleges Workshop in Louisville, KY
  • Semester Rx Proposal due by 11:59 pm

HOMEWORK, or what to complete before Monday, March 21 (after Spring Break)

  1. Read Blakeslee, “Analyzing Data” (see Canvas / Files)
  2. Sign up for your face-to-face conference with me about your Semester Rx Proposal

READING QUESTIONS: Using Blakeslee as a guide, sketch out your plan for getting started with your data. You should also write up a clear discussion of the tools you use (as discussed in the chapter), noting adaptions and adjustments you’ll make for your own primary sources.

WEEK  10

Spring Break!

Spring Break!

Spring Break!

WEEK  11

HOMEWORK, or what to complete before Monday, March 21 (after Spring Break)

  1. Read Blakeslee, “Analyzing Data” (see Canvas / Files)
  2. Sign up for your face-to-face conference with me about your Semester Rx Proposal

READING QUESTIONS: Using Blakeslee as a guide, sketch out your plan for getting started with your data. You should also write up a clear discussion of the tools you use (as discussed in the chapter), noting adaptions and adjustments you’ll make for your own primary sources.

Monday, March 21

  • Analyzing Data
  • Making Plans for Data Analysis and Discussion

HOMEWORK, or what to complete before Wednesday

  1. Revise and finalize your data analysis plans. Make sure this is shared in your 4341 folder. This is the final of the required Wednesday Writes. No exceptions.
  2. We are not meeting face-to-face on Wednesday, so make sure you have signed up for your mandatory semester project conference. Sign up for your conference here. 

Wednesday, March 23

  • Semester Rx Project Conferences
  • No f2f Class today—You should attend your selected conference meeting.

HOMEWORK, to be completed for Wednesday, March 30 (after Easter Break)

  1. Complete Research Memo #1 for Semester Project
  2. Read Marback, “Embracing Wicked Problems: The Turn to Design in Composition Studies” (see Canvas / Files)

READING QUESTIONS: (a) Why does Marback focus on composition studies, not writing studies? How do you understand his paradigm for composing? (b) What are wicked problems? What is the relationship between wicked problems and rhetorical theory (or threshold concepts)? (c) Where else have we encountered this lens for thinking about writing classrooms? What connects these two ideas?

Friday, March 25

Easter Holiday—No Classes

WEEK  10

Monday, March 28—No Classes: Easter Break

  1. Complete Research Memo #1 for Semester Project (due by 11:59 pm)
  2. Read Marback, “Embracing Wicked Problems: The Turn to Design in Composition Studies” (see Canvas / Files)

READING QUESTIONS: (a) Why does Marback focus on composition studies, not writing studies? How do you understand his paradigm for composing? (b) What are wicked problems? What is the relationship between wicked problems and rhetorical theory (or threshold concepts)? (c) Where else have we encountered this lens for thinking about writing classrooms? What connects these two ideas?

Wednesday, March 30

  • Marback and Wicked Problems
  • Second to last Wednesday Write due today (Marback only)

HOMEWORK, to be completed before next class

  1. No homework. Work on Research Memo #1.

Friday, April 1

  • Revising End-of-Semester Plan
  • Voting on Semester Presentation Format

HOMEWORK, to be completed before next class

  1. Read Kerry Dirk’s “Navigating Genres” (for final Wednesday Writes)

READING QUESTIONS: (a) What is a genre? Be able to discuss Dirk’s specific characteristics. (b) What seems to be the relationship between a rhetorical writing goal (teach, answer, solve) and genres? (c) What seems to affect genres? That is, what can make identifying and understanding genres tricky? (d) How do we, as composers, deal with this confusion? (e) What are the “rules” Dirk gives us for genres?

WEEK  11

Monday, April 4

HOMEWORK, or what you’re doing this week

I am leaving for the Conference on College Composition and Communication on Tuesday, so you’ll have two working days this week. Wednesday is your day to wrap up your secondary reading and/or to complete any primary research you need to for the project. My recommendation is that your reading and analyzing be done by Friday or Monday at the latest. You don’t want to go into Week 14 still sorting out what you know.

Wednesday, April 6

  • Work on readings
  • Work on primary research

HOMEWORK, to be completed before Friday

  1. Complete Research Memo #2.

Friday, April 8

HOMEWORK, to be completed before Monday

  1. Prepare your Potential Genres Pitch.
  2. On Monday, you will have ~3 minutes to complete an initial pitch for your final genre. You will need to provide examples of your proposed genres (either hardcopies and/or links to the genres themselves), and we’ll prefer online links to expedite our conversation on Monday.
  3. Add your name, your genre links, and your commentary to the 4341 Genre Pitches file.

You asked for a few more sample genres, so here are some of the strongest from last fall. These are first-year students, by the way. Given our context, not all of these are applicable for your semester project, but they would all be a good place to start. I hope you get some ideas and inspiration.

WEEK  14

Monday, April 11

  • Potential Genres Pitch Day

HOMEWORK, to be completed before Wednesday

  1. Using the feedback your peers provided, and my notes in your Research Memo #2, revise your pitch and/or focus it more clearly before peer review of full project on April 25.
  2. I will be available for conferences on Friday, April 15. Just send me a time you’d like to meet.
  3. We begin our Prototyping Presentations on Wednesday.
  4. Research Memo #3 is due by 11:50 am on Friday.

PROTOTYPING DISCUSSIONS

(1) Create at least two (2) prototypes for class review and discussion. These should be shared in your GDrive folder. Please create a new “prototype” folder within your 4341 folder for easier access and showcase.

Level of completeness depends on your presentation date. Those presenting this week will likely have true sketches, which means mock-ups of the genre and verbal notes only for the role of content in the genre itself. Those presenting next week should have less conceptual designs and clear considerations for how content and form work together.  

(2) Frame in action and learning.  

  1. Identify what you learned about your question. Bring specific notes for discussion: drop names and evidence.
  2. Make clear how your evidence is embedded throughout prototype if we can’t see it on your discussion day.
  3. Explain prototypes’ relationships to ongoing conversation related to your question AND your intended action for the genres selected.

Wednesday, April 13

  • Round 1 of Research Project Prototyping Discussion Begins.

HOMEWORK, or what you need to do for Friday

  1. Friday is the 15th Anniversary of SOURCE, and I have lots of students presenting, so I want to attend. I’d like you to attend as well and draw ideas for genres and integration of content.
  2. I will be available all day for conferencing. You just need to send me some times you’d like to meet. Note that I will be attending the Lightening Talks at 10 am and 11 am.
  3. Research Memo #3 is due by 11:50 am on Friday.

Friday, April 15

  • Research Memo #3 Due
  • SOURCE Symposium

HOMEWORK, or what you need to do for Monday

  1. Work on your prototypes if you are presenting next week.
  2. Start finalizing your project if you’ve already presented. You should have a complete draft of your project for Peer Review and Instructor Feedback on Monday, April 25.

WEEK  15

 Monday, April 18

  • Prototype Presentations

Wednesday, April 20

  • Prototype Presentations

HOMEWORK, to be complete ASAP

Beginning Thursday, April 21, you will be able to complete the course evaluations for this class. You’ll receive an email with instructions. These evaluations are very important for the university and for me. I will distribute my own evaluations—which focus more on the content of the course—next week. When you are writing your summary comments, I have a few additional questions that would help me evaluate the effectiveness of the course:

  1. In what ways did this class help clarify the interests of our discipline (Rhetoric & Composition)?
  2. In what ways, if any, did this course challenge your expectations for how you should talk about what it means to be an ENGW major?
  3. How, if at all, did the genre-focused, research-driven project affect your learning in this course?
  4. How useful was it for you (if at all) to work on this individually designed research project? How did designing your own discipline-related project contribute to your understanding of theories of rhetoric and composition?

Friday, April 22

  • Prototype Presentations

HOMEWORK, to be completed before Monday

We will have our one and only peer review of your semester projects on Monday. You should have a complete draft of your project shared here before 7:00 am on Monday, April 25. I will only respond to projects shared with this file by the deadline.

We will determine in class what form your peer review projects should take for Monday.

I also recommend you begin drafting your Author’s Note for the final submission.