Return to ENGW 2329 Syllabus

Document Design Week-by-Week Calendar

NOTE: The calendar is our game plan for the semester, but the dates and assignments are subject to change depending on our needs as a class. Check here often for updates and modifications. You’ll get plenty of notice when I adapt the anticipated schedule.

WEEK 16  |  Last Week!

HOMEWORK, or What you need to complete before Monday, April 29

By the time you come back to campus on Monday, you should have all of the above in a “placeholder” status. You should have decided if you will use pages or posts within WordPress. You don’t need to have polished anything, but you should have dumped the data into the chosen spots.

Next week, we’ll work on your sites in class on Monday. On Wednesday, you’ll complete course evaluations and a questionnaire for me. Then, the remaining time will be work time for you.

Monday, April 29 — Working on Unit #4

Our time is dedicated to you asking questions about and polishing your portfolio. If you have specific, technical questions, try and email me those as you encounter difficulties.

HOMEWORK, or what you need to complete before Wednesday

  • Make sure you have all the pieces in place for your portfolio. I’ll provide you with a worksheet checklist, which you can use to have a peer work through the site prior to submission during finals week.

Wednesday, May 1 — Last Day of Class

Today will be evaluation day, and I’ll also talk to you about a research project I am starting—one that will be better if I have your assistance. This is also the last day to ask for feedback/input from me about the overall design.

Here is a link to the ENGW & Design Perception survey.

FINAL EXAM: Thursday, May 9 from 1:30 – 3:30 PM

Your Unit #4 is due at the end of our Final Exam time. I will be in our regular classroom during the final exam time, from 1:30 until 3:30 pm, to answer questions and help you troubleshoot any issues that may come up at the last minute. Before 3:30 pm, (a) upload your memo of transmittal to your Dropbox folder, and (b) email me a link to your SEUfolio site. I will begin printing out memos at 3:31 pm. If yours is not there, you will be issued a 0 for Unit #4. If you fail to submit both the link and the memo, you will receive a 0 for Unit #4.

WEEK 15  |  Unit #3 Due; Developing Unit #4

One outcome for the ENGW degree states that students should demonstrate “the ability to evaluate and respond to the writing of others.” In your final ENGW portfolio, the one you’ll make as part of the Career Preparation course, you are required to include evidence of your ability to do just that. For Unit #3, we’ll be completing an in-class critique of your document makeover. You are required to bring a full draft (all 8 pages) of your document with you to class. Failure to (a) bring a draft of all the pages and/or (b) participate in the peer critique means you will lose one letter grade on your final submission.

Here’s what you need to have for our class on Monday:

      1. One copy of the original document. Please either make copies of or direct your peers and I to the pages you are incorporating in the redesign.
      2. One copy of your makeover for peer critique.
      3. One copy of your makeover for my critique.

I would also encourage you to review the evaluation criteria for this project:

Page Layout. How well does the document use white space, alignment, contrast, and other design principles to place elements on the page?

Typography. Does the document feature typographic choices that are appropriate for the specific audience, context, and purpose of this document? Does the document follow best practices for combining typefaces?

Styles. Does the document feature a robust and carefully designed style sheet? Are all elements in the document styled?

Images. How successfully does the document use graphics and/or photographs to enhance key elements of the text?

Correctness. Does the redesigned document correct any errors in standard written English (i.e., spelling, punctuation, grammar) that appeared in the original document? Does the memo adhere to the conventions of standard written English?

Monday, April 22 — Unit #3 Workshop

Using the feedback from today’s workshop, please make any changes and/or revisions you deem essential to meeting the evaluation criteria and/or improving the overall design of your makeover documents.

HOMEWORK, or What you need to complete before Wednesday

When you arrive for class on Wednesday, you should be prepared to submit to me the following deliverables:

      • A copy of the original document.
      • Your redesigned document, printed and bound as it should appear in its final format. Yes, your document needs to be a whole document, meaning it should be delivered to me in its intended format and shape. If you intended for it to be in color, the final version should appear in color. If you intended for the redesign to be black and white, the final version will be monochromatic.
      • Any drafts or interim versions of your document, if you believe they will help me evaluate your project more fairly. At the very least, you must return to me the documents reviewed on Monday along with the evaluation sheets generated in class (both peer and instructor forms).
      • A 1-2 page memo of transmittal to me, in which you address the rhetorical and technological aspects of your work and provide an honest self-assessment of your performance on this project. Your memo should look like a memo. Carefully and thoroughly edit and revise this document. You should not be submitting first drafts of your memos for a grade.
      • Finally, upload to your Dropbox folder a single zipped folder containing all of your electronic files for this project, named as follows: “2329 Unit 4.” If you don’t remember how to do this, here is the video that will walk you through the process.

Wednesday, April 24 — Unit #3 Due; Unit #4 Review, Preparation

After collecting your Unit #3 materials, we’ll begin preparation work for Unit #4. We are going to begin this work by reviewing my evaluation criteria for the project as well as the program evaluation criteria for digital portfolios. As a head’s up, there are discussions coming out the President’s Office which would suggest that all SEU graduates will be making digital portfolios before they graduate. This will most likely happen in the next year, so here’s your chance to get ahead of the pack. Know what you want. Get that first layer of icing on the cake, and be in a position to add to your site at the end of each semester (rather than scrambling for writing samples and evidence the week of your job interview).

As a reminder, each digital portfolio will contain a set number of documents:

      1. Introductory page. This page should welcome visitors (potential employers) and explain the purpose, organization, design of your site. Think of this as the navigation portal: help them know what to look for and prepare users for the presentation of information.
      2. Biography or résumé page. Depending on your career plans, you may need to write a curriculum vitae and/or find examples appropriate to your discipline.
      3. Five samples of your best work at St. Edward’s. You are required to include at lease two samples from ENGW 2329; otherwise, the materials you include should be relevant for your likely audience and intended purpose. There should be a logic to the chosen samples as well as some variety. Show the users breadth and depth. Unless the design of the document is integral to the presentation, these samples should be embedded in your site, not simply uploaded in existing .doc files.
      4. Reflection and commentary on these samples. You cannot simply upload work and expect users to understand what they are seeing. You need to contextualize the materials, highlighting and explaining what each sample demonstrates about your abilities and skills.
      5. At least one page related to an extracurricular project, hobby, or organization. You are more than your St. Edward’s coursework. Show this to viewers. Let them see the writing you do at Hilltop Views. What are your passions? your interests? you related skills and talents that might distinguish you from another candidate?

HOMEWORK, or What you need to complete before Monday, April 29

By the time you come back to campus on Monday, you should have all of the above in a “placeholder” status. You should have decided if you will use pages or posts within WordPress. You don’t need to have polished anything, but you should have dumped the data into the chosen spots.

Next week, we’ll work on your sites in class on Monday. On Wednesday, you’ll complete course evaluations and a questionnaire for me. Then, the remaining time will be work time for you.

As a reminder, your final Unit #4 project is due on Thursday, May 9 at 3:30 pm. I will be in our regular classroom during the final exam time to answer questions and help you troubleshoot any issues that may come up at the last minute. Before 3:30 pm, you will upload your memo of transmittal to your Dropbox folder. I will begin printing out memos at 3:31 pm. If yours is not there, you will be issued a 0 for Unit #4.

NOTE: As a reminder, any revisions you wish to submit of Unit #1 and/or Unit #2 are due to your Dropbox folder by 7:59 am on Monday, April 29. All revisions begin with a conference with me; during that conference meeting, we will discuss a revision plan for your project. You will then submit the revision to me along with a revision memo, explaining the changes you made. Also, some of you are still missing Designer Analysis pieces. These 5 activities are worth 100 points. I will accept these up until 7:59 am on Monday, April 29. Any work submitted after that deadline will not be graded.

WEEK 14  |  Exam 2, Workshop Time

Monday, April 15 — Exam 2

Part I or Part II of your Exam 2 was due at the end of class today. You chose a section to complete as part of the take-home exam. That portion is due at the beginning of class on Wednesday.

Wednesday, April 17 — Guest Speaker, Unit #3 Workshop

We will have a guest speaker at the beginning of class. You will complete a quick questionnaire to prepare you for our discussion. You will have the remaining time in class to work on your Unit #3 makeover.

HOMEWORK, or What you need to complete before Monday

      • Unit #3 is due for an in-class peer review on Monday, April 22.
      • Bring a black-and-white hardcopy of Unit #3 to class as well as digital PDFs of the final version.
      • These peer review materials are required as part of your Unit #4 (and as part of the ENGW portfolio prepared in Career Prep), so participation is not optional. Failure to participate in the workshop and/or arriving with incomplete projects will mean you lose one full letter grade on your final Unit #3 assignment.
      • Unit #3 will be due at the beginning of class on Wednesday, April 24.

As a reminder, any revisions you wish to submit of Unit #1 and/or Unit #2 are due to your Dropbox folder by 7:59 am on Monday, April 29. All revisions begin with a conference with me; during that conference meeting, we will discuss a revision plan for your project. You will then submit the revision to me along with a revision memo, explaining the changes you made.

Some of you are still missing Designer Analysis pieces. These 5 activities are worth 100 points. I will accept these up until 7:59 am on Monday, April 29. Any work submitted after that deadline will not be graded.

Want some extra credit points? This Friday, the Symposium on Undergraduate Research and Creative Expression (SOURCE) will be taking place on campus. Here is a link to the program schedule. If you would like to earn up to 25 extra points, locate the poster presentation room. Looking at the various posters created by your colleagues from across campus, identify strategic uses of the six design principles, grids, and/or typography. Please be sure to capture the examples, and in your write up (similar to a Design Analysis), either embed the images and/or attach them separately. If you don’t have a way to easily capture the images, please describe what you see in detail for me, referencing the poster. I’ll be there looking at them, so a few key reminders will jog my memory. You may also opt to do the same for the oral presentations. Note, however, that you’ll be commenting on slides and Prezis instead. For full credit, all the information must be uploaded to your Dropbox by 7:59 am on Monday, April 22. Please save the file in your Designer ID folder, using the file name ExtraCredit.

WEEK 13  |  Workshop, Exam Review

Monday, April 8 — InDesign Workshop, Consultations

I uploaded another InDesign workshop for you to complete during class today; this one is meant to help you think about laying out grids and working with pages, all of which will scaffold the work for Unit #3. We also reviewed your preliminary sketches for WP3, so let’s be in conversation about revisions and changes as you make them.

Use your Quick Reference Guide from IT, or here’s some help if you need it:

Homework: or, What you need to complete before class on Wednesday

      • Review pages 148-206 in Thinking with Type
      • Read Chapter 9 (Tables) in Document Design. Please complete exercise #2 on page 308. Bring your response to class with you.
      • We’ll talk about both of these readings in the context of our upcoming Exam 2. We’ll also do a review of the material to be covered by the exam, so bring any questions you have about the chapters and readings we’ve covered. We’ll be working on a third InDesign workshop on Wednesday (this one focused on CSS). Both will be due at the end of class on Wednesday.
      • As a reminder, there will be a take-home portion for the Exam 2, which you’ll return on Wednesday, April 17.

Wednesday, April 10 — Exam #2 Review, CSS Workshop

We’ll review the readings for this week, look at your answers to the exercise homework, and address any questions or concerns you have before the last in-class exam, which will also include a take-home portion.

HOMEWORK, or What you need to complete before Monday’s class

      • Review your notes and reading assignments in preparation for Exam #2. There is an in-class portion and a take-home portion.

WEEK 12  |  Unit #3

Wednesday, April 3 — Unit #3 Discussion

We discussed Chapters 4 and 5 from Document Design, looking for examples of media and format as well as visual weight and grids in page design and spreads in the magazines I brought to class. I also gave you time in class to begin sketching your redesign for Unit #3.

Homework: or, What you need to complete before class on Monday

      • Read pages 148-206 in Thinking with Type
      • Complete your sketch of Unit #3 makeover. The goal is not to have the basal text in place, but I do what to see how you’ll be using grids, power zones, typographic systems, and visual weight in your final version.
      • You also have a series of questions to answer, based on the Design Tips boxes in your textbook. Please include these answers on a separate sheet of paper, and submit these to me with your paper mock-up.

Functional Analysis: In one sentence, explain the communicative effect you hope to achieve with your redesign: informative, supporting assessment, instructive, persuasive, motivational, affective. Then, determine the needs of readers; explain to me, in a few sentences, how your redesign will better showcase the content of your document based on the actions the readers must perform after using the document. Building out of Unit #2, you should be able to identify the rhetorical situation surrounding documents and effectively address potential issues with those documents.

Users’ Modes of Reading (120): How do you anticipate users working with your Unit #3 document? Sketch out possible answers to all four points, thinking through what each means for your document and its redesign.

Showing Hierarchy (125): On plain 8.5 x 11 inch paper (please, no notebook paper), map out a plan for one page of your document using the tips provided (this is in addition to the full mock-up; however, if you want to designate one page of your sketch to this activity, just note which page you’re using). Here, I’m looking for visual “boxes” not written content.

Power Zones (127): Again, on plain paper and working with one page of your document, map out the tips for power zones.

Finally, experiment visually with the concept of grids. Page 132 begins the discussion on “Using Grids for Page Design” (which is also the focus of your reading for Monday). Locate at least two (2) sources of inspiration: one source should follow the conventional page design described, and the final source should ignore the advice. For these sources, think through the questions provided in your book (and below):

1. What are the purposes of the conventions you see in the page design?

2. What seem to be the motivations behind breaking page design conventions?

3. What perceptual, cultural, and rhetorical effects does following or breaking conventions seem to involve?

4. How do we decide where to strike a balance between following and breaking conventions?

Some tips and advice as you’re selecting your Unit #3 document…

First of all, please review the language of your assignment sheet: “Working from the premise that all documents can be improved, this assignment asks you to select a complex document in need of significant revision, reorganization, or redesign, and give it an ‘extreme makeover.’” Some of the samples you scavenged for yesterday were not complex, nor were they in need of significant revision, reorganization, and/or redesign. Your final project is judged against where you started, so choose wisely. Remember, the final project should include no less than 8 pages of material.

Consider the ideas from our functional design reading. Your final Unit #3 should illustrate that design begins with articulating and evaluating different kinds of constraints—your redesign should be solving a rhetorical problem unresolved in the original form.

Finally, remember the evaluation criteria for this project:

Page Layout. How well does the document use white space, alignment, contrast, and other design principles to place elements on the page? Here is where I’ll be looking to see how you use grids, power zones, and visual weight.

Typography. Does the document feature typographic choices that are appropriate for the specific audience, context, and purpose of this document? Does the document follow best practices for combining typefaces? By this point in the semester, you should have no problem creating a typographic system to control for all the possible variations within a document. You should be selecting a document for redesign that will allow you to show what you know.

Styles. Does the document feature a robust and carefully designed style sheet? Are all elements in the document styled? This technical requirement will be covered in Monday’s in-class workshop.

Images. How successfully does the document use graphics and/or photographs to enhance key elements of the text? Remember that tables, lists, and forms count as graphics, so the redesign does not necessarily need to include images.

Correctness. Does the redesigned document correct any errors in standard written English (i.e., spelling, punctuation, grammar) that appeared in the original document? Does the memo adhere to the conventions of standard written English? It should go without saying that attention to detail matters.

Monday, April 8 — TT Discussion; InDesign Workshop

In class on Monday, you’ll complete an InDesign activity geared at helping you work with grids, create a style sheet, and layout a typography system—all of which are part of the requirements for Unit #3. This will take up the bulk of our time, though we’ll discuss how the day’s reading feeds into the activity. Your workshop redesign will be due at the end of class time.

Note that you’ll be reading Chapter 9 for Wednesday, and you’ll be asked to locate and bring to class one list, one table, and one form for our critique. The other time that day will be spent reviewing for the Exam 2, which you will begin on Monday, April 15. There is a take-home portion of the exam, but the bulk of the work will be completed in class, just as you did for Exam 1.

As a head’s up, please note that this will leave us one full class period for a workday (04/17/2013) prior to the submission of Unit #3, which is due at the beginning of class on April 22, 2013. On that Wednesday, I’ll be circulating and consulting with you about your redesign.

WEEK 11  |  Unit #2 Due; Beginning Units #3 and #4

Monday, March 25 — Unit #2 Due; CSS in WordPress Workshop

Today, we’ll have IT back in for another training workshop. We’re thinking about Unit #4 and your digital portfolio. We began practicing with CSS (which is required for the final projects, Unit #3 and Unit #4).

Homework: or, What you need to complete before class on Wednesday

          • Review the guidelines for Unit #3.
          • Read Leo Lentz and Henk Pander Maat’s “Functional Analysis for Document Design,” which is available via the SEU databases. [If you have trouble with the link, here is the remaining citation information: Technical Communication 51.3 (2004): 387-398.]

Wednesday, March 27 — Unit #3 Discussion and Preparations

Today, we’ll discuss the specifics of Unit #3, and you will have a chance to look at some samples from other students.

I’d still like to encourage you to consider enrolling in Online Writing in the fall:

Online Writing teaches both the technical and rhetorical aspects of web design. The main project for the semester has you work one-on-one with a client to develop a fully operational website. During that project, you will master intermediate-level HTML and CSS including emerging HTML5 standards. But most importantly, you will learn how to develop rhetorically savvy websites that employ quality user experience principles to engage with the viewer.

HOMEWORK, or What you need to complete before Wednesday, April 3

          • Read Chapter 4, “The Whole Document,” and Chapter 5, “Pages,” in Document Design.
          • Begin gathering and collecting materials that might be appropriate for the Unit #3 makeover assignment. Please remember that you need no less than 8 pages. You should also be thinking about possible constraints and limitations that might affect your final product: use of images, electronic copies versus scanning, etc.

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION: Thursday, April 4 is the last day to withdraw from any of your classes. If you have missed more than three (3) of our class meetings, you should review my absence policy. I would also encourage you to make an appointment to come talk with me if you are missing assignments. You can review your grade in Blackboard, and the grading scale for our class is available here.

WEEK 10  |  Visual Identity Packages

Monday, March 18 — Working Day

The 50% option on your Exam 1 is due today. The rest of our time is consult work for Unit #2.

Homework: or, What you need to complete before class on Wednesday

              • I’d like the groups to swap materials on Wednesday, so please have black-and-white copies (.PDFs) of your materials for exchange. I, too, will provide written feedback to the groups, and you’ll have the remaining time in class to complete the project, which is due at the beginning of class on Monday.
              • Make sure you’ve got access to your SEU folio site. I’d also like you to upload a paper or resume in the next week in advance of our CSS workshop next Monday.
              • As a reminder, revisions of Unit #1 will be due before we leave for Easter, which will be 5:00 pm on Wednesday, March 27.

Wednesday, March 20 — Working Day, Workshop

Today, we swapped projects, and your group now has feedback from your colleagues and from me to help you polish and refine for Monday’s submission deadline.

Homework: or, What you need to complete before class on Monday

Here is a checklist for your group. Please make sure that each item comes into me on Monday at the beginning of class:

logo or wordmark, with instructions for usage;
Recommended typefaces, with instructions for usage;
color scheme, with instructions for usage; and,
A proposed slogan that enhances the visual brand identity.

Two sample documents + One-page letter of transmittal to your client (real or fictional) introducing the visual identity package.

An analysis memo (roughly 400–600 words, single-spaced, using memo formatting) from your team to your professor that explains your work on this project and honestly discusses any challenges or difficulties your team encountered during this assignment.

Printed, color copies of your visual identity package (the above elements) and memo are due at the beginning of class on Monday, March 25.

In addition, you should upload electronic copies of your files (as .doc, .docx, .pages) to my Dropbox before you come to class on that day.

On Monday, we’ll have IT back in for another training workshop. We’re thinking about Unit #4 and your digital portfolio. If you think about it this weekend, go ahead and make sure you have a few pages created in your SEUFolio site. We’ll be practicing with CSS (which is required for the final projects, Unit #3 and Unit #4), so we want material in place for you to work with and have questions about.

WEEK 9  |  SPRING BREAK

Monday, March 11— Spring Break

Wednesday, March 13 — Spring Break

Homework: or, What you need to complete before class on Monday, 03/18/2013

              • If you are taking the 50% option on your Exam 1, remember that you’ll need to bring your exam and your 50% answers back on Monday.
              • Monday will be a workday for us, and I’ll be circulating for consults.

WEEK 8  |  EXAM 1; Graphics

Monday, March 4 — Exam #1

Hopefully you didn’t feel like there were any surprises on the exam, and as we talk about the work this week, we’ll continue to emphasize those key elements that make up the choices we make about design.

HOMEWORK: or, What you need to complete before Wednesday’s class

              • Read Chapter 7: Graphics in Document Design.
              • Review the SEU Brand Identity Guidelines.
              • Revise (if necessary) your Collaborative Task Sheet.

Wednesday, March 6 — Graphics, Brands, and Time

We’ll have our much overdue discussion about the SEU Brand Identity Guidelines (as a way to think about how your group will write up the instructions for usage to accompany the logo, typefaces, and color schemes for your own materials. I will also bring in some of the materials from last semester so you can get a sense of what the “final” products might look like.

We’ll talk about graphics, including infographics, and consider ways in which they will or will not be featured in your materials. For fun, there are lots of sites that have great resources, including Daily Infographic and the Freshman Technology Survey for SEU.

During the remaining work time, I’ll be meeting with each group to get a sense of where you are in the production of your materials. Sketches? Prototypes? Outlines? After Spring Break, we’ll have one week together before these projects are due, and I want to make sure that you’re getting as much feedback from me as you need to complete the assignment.

HOMEWORK: or, What you need to complete before class on Monday (03/18/13)

When we come back from Spring Break, we will use that Monday as an all-class work session because I want the two groups to swap materials for a peer critique session at the beginning of class on Wednesday. You’ll want rough drafts of everything by then, including the memos and instructions. These will not need to be perfect; in fact, there might be some benefit to having materials that are horizontal and not vertical (think lo-fi and hi-fi prototypes here).

I want to, again, remind you that we’re thinking about the rhetorical situations surrounding these documents, not simply about the documents themselves. Who will be using them? How are they approaching the document? How will they be used? What will happen to the materials after use? Please ask questions.

WEEK 7  |  VISUAL IDENTITY GROUP WORK

Monday, February 25 — Exam Review, Task Sheets

As we discussed in class, there are a couple of things we needed to address today. First, you uploaded your .PDFs of your posters to your online portfolios, and we created pages for your resumes. We reviewed for our exam—which is one week from today—and I met with groups to discuss your Collaboration Task sheets.

HOMEWORK: or, What you need to complete before Wednesday’s class

              • If you still have not signed up for the Designer Identification due dates, please do this ASAP. Remember that you have this ongoing work, and you can find more information (including a link to sign-up for a due date) here.
              • Prepare your interview questions for the client meeting with Dr. Lynn Rudloff for Wednesday. I reviewed your preliminary questions today, but refine them. Make sure that you have clear answers to the three differentiation questions for branding and visual identity purposes: Who are you? What do you do? Why does it matter?
              • Read pages 84 – 146 in Thinking with TypeAs we discussed today, this information will be on the exam on Monday, but you have the reading notes to assist you.

Wednesday, February 27 — Client Interview, Group Work Time

HOMEWORK: or, What you need to prepare for Monday’s class

              • Your first in-class exam is Monday.

 

WEEK 6  |  COLLABORATING, VISUAL IDENTITY

Monday, February 18 — PRDD Exercise

As we discussed in class, experience and student feedback tells me that one of the more complicated aspects of Unit #2 is the collaboration required to complete the work. However, for the rest of your professional life, you’ll be working with and delegating tasks to others, and it’s good practice to determine your “leadership” style in a low-stakes environment, such as ours. No one will be fired here.

HOMEWORK: or, What you need to complete before Wednesday’s class

              • In your groups, delegate and assign responsibilities for completing your FYW program teaching observation prototype. I want to see two complete prototypes from each group (without the slogan and logo).
              • The foundation for tomorrow’s discussion will center around how each group determined who would complete what task and how your group communicated outside of class time.
              • We’ll also be diving into the SEU Brand Identity Guidelines and discussing the umbrella topic that will guide Unit #2.
              • Finally, if you have not completed the Collaboration Survey, please do so. This will help us structure your groups and troubleshoot for “known” issues.
              • And, again, if you have not completed the Week 5 Barometer, this is your last chance to do so. I cannot make changes to improve your learning without your feedback.
              • Finally, some of you have not signed up for the Designer Identification due dates. Please remember that you have this ongoing work, and you can find more information (including a link to sign-up for a due date) here.

Wednesday, February 20 — What is a brand? What guidelines?

Today, we discussed the effectiveness of PRDD for group work, and we also considered the issues you faced while working on a project outside of class time. We talked about what makes a “brand,” and we explored why we, as ENGW people would care about brands: identification! Finally, we discussed the SEU Brand Identity Guidelines as a way to think about the requirements for Unit #2. Whew! Now, it is time to start thinking about how to move forward with Unit #2.

HOMEWORK: or, What you need to prepare before class on Monday

              • Our first in-class exam will be on Monday, March 4, 2013, so we’ll start class off next week with a review. Bring your textbooks. Bring your questions and/or concerns. My exams typically take a varied approach, one that allows you to demonstrate that you know the content of the course and to apply that knowledge in reasonable, smart ways. Thus, you should be prepared too work with a variety of question types: Definitions, Multiple Choice, True / False, Fill in the Blank, Identification / Diagrams, Short Answers, Application Activity. Remember that the purpose of exams is not to test you on minutiae; instead, you should prepare yourself by focusing on those terms, concepts, and practices that reinforce the work you’re being asked to complete in the course: design posters for particular audiences and, now, create a visual identity package.
              • In addition to reviewing for the exam, each group will meet with me to discuss their draft of the Collaboration Task Sheet. I want to know what research you need to complete before you begin working on prototypes and/or finalizing your additional documents. I want to know your communication plan, and, most importantly, I want to know who is doing what and how the breakdown of work is fair, ethical, and reasonable given what each of you will bring to the table.
              • As a head’s up, I have confirmed that Dr. Lynn Rudloff, acting Director of First-Year Writing, will visit our class on Wednesday, February 27. You and your group members may want to start thinking about questions you’d like to ask her about the FYW program. Remember that the key questions you need to address (and answer) in your visual identity package are: Who are you? What do you do? Why does it matter?
              • Remember that you should have signed up for your Design(er) Identifications. You’ll find more information and a link to the sign-up sheet on the assignment page.

NOTE: If you are looking for information from Weeks 1-5, please click here.